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Solid Advice On Filing For Personal Bankruptcy

Jul 4

Solid Advice On Filing For Personal Bankruptcy

Filing personal bankruptcy is not like it used to be. It used to be reserved for low income families that just could not make payments on their lines of credit. These days, people of all income levels are filing for personal bankruptcy. Read through the advice that follows to learn if your situation requires you to take the big leap to file for bankruptcy.

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If you are considering paying your taxes with credit cards and turning around and filing bankruptcy--they are on to you. Most of the time, you cannot discharge this debt. As a result, you will owe the IRS a lot of money. If the tax can be discharged, so can the debt. Therefore, you should not pull your credit card out for purchases if it is just going to be discharged during the bankruptcy.

 

Trying to exclude family members you owe money to before filing for personal bankruptcy can get you into serious hot water. The court will look into who you pay-off as far as a year back, and if they find you showing favor to family over other creditors, they could invalidate your filing completely.

 

Don't give up. Once bankruptcy has been filed, you may be able to regain possession of items such as electronic goods or cars that were taken away from you. You should be able to get your possessions back if they have been taken away from you within 90 days before you filed for bankruptcy. Speak with your attorney about filing the correct petition to get your property back.

 

If you can, keep some of your debt out of your bankruptcy. Work on paying down this debt yourself, or especially if you can negotiate a lower rate or new payment terms. This will help to preserve your credit rating, to some extent, because bankruptcy itself will do a number on your score.

 

Before meeting with a lawyer, start compiling all of the documentation and paperwork you will need to provide an accurate picture of your finances. Gather six months' worth of pay stubs, bank statements, bills and credit card statements. Create a list of property and assets that you own. Having this entire information ready from the beginning can save you trouble when it's time to file.

 

Start planning for your life after bankruptcy now. The entire process can be very overwhelming, and leave you feeling like you have few to little options. You begin rebuilding your financial future right away. Get solid advice from trusted sources, be prepared to work hard at it, and most importantly, don't be afraid to dream again!

 

Remember that certain kinds of debt won't be discharged even after you have filed for bankruptcy. If you have outstanding student loans, owe child or spousal support, a divorce settlement agreement, or unpaid taxes, you will still be liable for these debts. Also, if you forget to list certain debts on your court documents, you won't be able to add them in the future.

 

Hopefully, you have learned what you need to know about personal bankruptcy. The advice that has been gathered into this article is meant to help you make the right choices when the time comes to file or to help you decide if it is the right move for you to make. Use this as a guide to help decide.